Speakers

 

PLEASE NOTE: THE SCHOOL HAS BEEN POSTPONED TO 2022.

DATES WILL BE FIXED SOON.


WefaHICAGregory Abowd, Georgia Tech, USA

Bio

Gregory D. Abowd is a Regents’ Professor and J.Z. Liang Chair in the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech, where he has been on the faculty since 1994. He also serves as an Associate Dean in the College of Computing. An applied computer scientist, Dr. Abowd’s research interests concern how the advanced information technologies of mobile, wearable and ubiquitous computing impact our everyday lives when they are seamlessly integrated into our living spaces. Dr. Abowd’s work has involved applications as diverse as education (Classroom 2000), home life (The Aware Home) and health (technology and autism, CampusLife). He and his current and former students are active inventors of new sensing and interaction technologies. He has recently helped to co-create an interdisciplinary research effort, COSMOS, which investigates the collaboration of materials, manufacturing, electronics, computing and design to explore an alternative future computing industry. Dr. Abowd is an ACM Fellow and a member of the ACM SIGCHI Academy.

Talk: “Computational Materials: putting computational functions into materials”
Abstract

Revisiting Weiser’s 30-year old inspirational vision on ubiquitous computing, we see that there are three factors that today limit the kind of ubiquity that Weiser described: power, cost, and form factor. Using these factors to drive our efforts, we have created examples of computational materials at Georgia Tech that demonstrate self-sustaining computational devices that are manufactured with simple materials to perform interesting sensing and communication tasks. These computational materials can be more literally woven into the fabric of everyday life, inspiring many more applications of ubiquitous computing, as well as many avenues for research challenges. We will demonstrate some of these early examples, motivating an Internet of Materials vision. Is this a logical progression from the Internet of Things, or something fundamentally new?  I will present examples of computational materials that have been created at Georgia Tech in collaboration with materials scientists, chemical engineers, and other disciplines. I will also discuss some of the exciting research challenges for this emerging field.

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StreitzNorbert A. Streitz, Scientific Director of Smart Future Initiative

Bio
Dr. Norbert Streitz (Ph.D. in physics, Ph.D. in cognitive science) is a Senior Scientist and Strategic Advisor with more than 35 years of experience in ICT. Founder and Scientific Director of the Smart Future Initiative launched in 2009. 1987–2008: Deputy Director and Division Manager at Fraunhofer Institute, Darmstadt, Germany. Lecturer at the Computer Science Department, Technical University Darmstadt. 1978–1986: Assistant Professor at Psychology Department, Technical University Aachen (RWTH). At different times of his career, post-doc research fellow at the University of California, Berkeley; visiting scholar at Xerox PARC, Palo Alto; and Intelligent Systems Lab, Tsukuba Science City, Japan. He has published/edited 30 books and authored/co-authored more than 160 peer-reviewed papers in a wide range of areas: Cognitive Science, Human-Computer Interaction, Experience Design, Hypertext/Hypermedia, CSCW, Ubiquitous Computing, Ambient Intelligence, Privacy by Design, Industry 4.0, Autonomous Driving, Hybrid Smart Cities and Smart Airports. Norbert was a PI of many projects funded by the European Commission and other funding agencies as well as industry. He has organized and chaired many conferences and is regularly invited as a keynote speaker at international commercial as well as scientific events. (https://www.smart-future.net/norbert-streitz/)

Talk: Redefining the “Smart-Everything” paradigm

Abstract

This talk presents a critical and constructive reflection and evaluation of the “Smart-Everything” Paradigm, especially from a user-interaction and design perspective. ‘Smart’ services exploiting data collected by a range of sensors being part of an Internet of Things (IoT) infrastructure and controlled by software based on Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) result in an increasing degree of automation, lack of transparency and privacy infringements. Humans are increasingly removed from being the ‘operator’ and thus in control of their environment and decisions, because they are – at an ostensible level of the discussion – considered to be the cause of errors, e.g., in automated driving, smart cities, manufacturing processes, bank credit assessment.

Our proposal is to redefine the ‘Smart-Everything’ Paradigm via a human-/citizen-centred design approach, keeping the human in the loop, looking at the interaction and balance of mental structures, social structures, information structures, and architectural structures, i.e. the built urban environment. Considering the following design trade-offs is central: complete automation vs. human control and empowerment, importunate smartness vs. privacy. Application examples are taken from the domain of ‘smart’ cities, urban spies and automated driving with the goal to move beyond ‘smart-only’ cities towards humane, sociable, cooperative, self-aware hybrid cities.

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KuflikTsvi Kuflik, University of Haifa, Israel

Bio

Tsvi Kuflik is a full professor and former head of the Information Systems Department at the University of Haifa, Israel. His main areas of research are Ubiquitous User Modelling and Intelligent User Interfaces. For over than fifteen years Tsvi is leading a research group at the University of Haifa, focusing on “Active Museum” – applying novel computing and communication technology for supporting museum visitors. Previously he was a researcher at the scientific and technological research institution in Trento Italy. Prior to that, Tsvi coordinated an industrial consortium that developed and implemented software reuse methodology. Prof. Kuflik is the author of over 250 referred publications in journals and conferences proceedings. Tsvi has been the chair and organizer of numerous international conferences and workshops, including the series of Personal Access to Cultural Heritage (PACTH) workshops during the past twelve years,. Tsvi is a distinguished ACM scientist, a senior IEEE member and the chair emeritus of IUI steering committee.

Talk: Advanced ubiquitous, context-aware technology for smart spaces
Abstract

The talk will present a variety of technologies that can be applied for providing personalized, context-aware support for users in smart spaces. The talk will start by describing several applications of smart museums and their underlying technologies and use these concrete examples as a starting point for discussions about users’ needs, possible current and future solutions that may be considered and integrated when a smart environment is designed.

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AG9ryGRwNikos Avouris, University of Patras, Greece

Bio

Professor of Human-Computer Interaction, University of Patras, Greece, head of the Interaction Technologies Lab and Director of the Joined Master in Human-Computer Interaction (hcimaster.upatras.gr). Experience of over 30 years in research and teaching in the area of interaction design and human-computer interaction with emphasis on locative media, study of interaction with cultural heritage and online learning. Member of IFIP TC-13.

Talk: Designing location-based experiences     
Abstract

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xPoZjt_gPanos Markopoulos, Chair, Design for Behaviour Change, Eindhoven University of Technology

Bio

Panos Markopoulos is a computer scientist specialized in the field of human-computer interaction and interaction design. He studied in the National Technical University of Athens and completed his PhD in Computer Science at Queen Mary University of London. He has worked on several topics of this field, such as task analysis, engineering methods for interactive systems, ambient intelligence, end-user development, privacy, rehabilitation technology, persuasion and interaction design for children. Panos is chair in Design for Behaviour Change, at the Department of Industrial Design at the Eindhoven University of Technology. Previously, he has held research positions at Queen Mary, University of London, and Philips Research, Eindhoven. He has co-authored more than 250 peer-reviewed publications in the topics mentioned above. He is a co-founder and chief editor of Elsevier’s International Journal on Child Computer Interaction, and author of a book on Evaluating Children’s Interactive Products. He has been the principal investigator for several national and EU projects, and has led the TU/e participation in several international projects. He is currently chief editor of the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, by Taylor&Francis.

Talk: Interaction design and rehabilitation
Abstract

Well-known trends pertaining to the aging of population and the rising costs of healthcare motivate the development of rehabilitation technology. There is a considerable tradition of research and development in this area including efforts to make serious games, virtual reality, and robotic applications. Numerous and diverse technological innovations have been introduced over the years and often researchers produce promising experimental results. However, it is quite often that these technologies fall short of delivering the benefits anticipated.

This talk argues for the importance of interaction design in this field that pays due attention to understanding patient needs, allowing patients, therapists and care givers to personalize solutions, providing effective feedback and motivation strategies, and seeking an in-depth understanding of the socio-technical system in which the rehabilitation technology is embedded. The talk reviews related research carried out at the Eindhoven University of Technology together with collaborating organizations, in the areas of tangible and embodied interaction, emphasizing on design methodology challenges that characterize this domain.

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Ctwpgj7QPatrice L. (Tamar) Weiss, Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa

Bio

Prof. Weiss directs and manages clinical research projects at the University of Haifa’s Laboratory for Innovations in Rehabilitation Technology (LIRT) where she develops and evaluates novel virtual environments, haptic interfaces, co-located and online technologies to explore the effect of individual and collaborative rehabilitation. Rehabilitation and special education populations of interest include stroke, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, developmental coordination disorder, autism and head trauma. She worked with the Gertner Institute led by Prof. Mordechai Shani to develop and implement ReAbility Online, a tele-rehabilitation system which won first prize in the 2014 AbbVie-TEDMED competition for sustainable healthcare.  Prof. Weiss’ research has been funded by the European Union, the Israel Science Foundation, the Israeli Ministry of Science and Technology and the Israeli Center of Research Excellence: Learning in a NetworKed Society.  She studies collaborative technologies and 3D printing as novel pedagogical and rehabilitation methods. She is a founding board member of the International Society for Virtual Rehabilitation and Steering committee chair of the International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation series. She has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters, co-edited two books, and delivered numerous keynote addresses at international conferences.

Talk: The challenge of technology uptake in educational and clinical settings: barriers and cacilitators
Abstract

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3NahVA2wNarcis Pares, Univ. Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain

Bio

Narcís Parés is a Tenure Associate Professor in the ICT Department (DTIC) of Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain). His research is focused on Full-body Interaction based on theories of Embodied Cognition, Human-Computer Interaction, Developmental Psychology, etc. He leads the Full-Body Interaction Lab within the Cognitive Media Technologies Group. His approach starts from Interaction Design, Interactive Communication and Interaction Models. His background is: PhD in Audiovisual Communication -specialized in Virtual Reality- (UPF), MSc in Image Processing and Artificial Intelligence (UAB) and BSc in Computer Engineering (UPC). He is co-creator and was coordinator of the Interdisciplinary Master in Cognitive Systems and Interactive Media (UPF) for ten years. He has been secretary of the Audiovisual University Institute (IUA of UPF) and head of the Interactive Systems Laboratory (IUA). He is co-founder and scientific director of Galeria Virtual from 1993 to 2000, where he directed the technological aspects of a number of experimental Virtual Reality productions applied to contemporary art. He is a member of the Steering Committee of the ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Interaction Design and Children and a member of the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Child Computer Interaction, Elsevier.

Talk: Meaningful use of full-body interaction in interactive playgrounds for children
Abstract

The possibility of designing interactive experiences in which the body of the user is put in relation with the physical space and other users in this space, provides a huge potential that may take advantage of the users’ kinaesthetic abilities, their proprioception, their knowledge on navigating and exploring the world, the relation of scale that their body constantly provides to relate to objects and volumes, their capacity to change point of view, the possibility of manipulating objects, etc., etc., etc. This potential has made full-body interaction increasingly popular during the last ten years. However, it is disappointing to see how many such interactive experiences actually treat the body of users as mere cursors in a large projection where users are essentially asked to point at giant menu options and oversized buttons. In this lecture, we will analyse some of the general theories that inform full-body interaction and we will see examples of how we can justify its use in experiences that make good use of its essential properties. The topics that will be covered are:

  • What is Full-Body Interaction?
  • Three pillars: Embodied Cognition, Developmental Psychology, and Physiology
  • Meaning generation through Full-Body Interaction in Interactive Communication and Experience Design
  • Examples of my work in Full-Body Interaction Environments for Children
  • FUBImethod: a method for raising body awareness in co-design teams through a framework that guides the design and evaluates the usefulness of embodied design techniques for children

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Immagine 059Nuno Nunes, Tecnico, U. Lisbon, Portugal

Bio

Nuno Nunes (nunojnunes.me) is a Full professor at Técnico U. Lisbon and the President of the Interaction Technologies Institute (ITI) a research unit of the LARSYS Associated Laboratory (iti.larsys.pt). He’s also co-Director of the Carnegie Mellon International partnership (www.cmuportugal.org) and adjunct faculty at the HCII at CMU. Nuno’s research interests lie in the application of models to software, system and service design for the domains of environmental sustainability and participatory culture. Nuno is a strong advocate of the role of design in engineering. Nuno organised several key conferences of the ACM SIGCHI (www.sigchi.org) and published more than 150 peer-reviewed papers in international journals and conferences in the areas of software engineering, HCI and service science. He was PI and co-PI of several research projects totalling more than 12M€ from European to nationally and industry-funded.

Talk: Eco-centric interaction for the re-balance of the relations between humans and nature
Abstract

The twin crisis of climate and nature requires the HCI community to rethink how to design technological interventions that reconcile concepts and theories for ecological computing and more-than-human design promoting climate and biodiversity actions and nature awareness and conservation. I will present insights, case studies and design guidelines on how to use technology to support more eco-centric interactions. Through these examples, I build the case for this new perspective which I named eco-centric interaction design.

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wk-hyUwAFabio Paterno, ISTI-CNR, Italy

Bio

Fabio Paternò is Research Director at CNR-ISTI, where he founded and leads the Laboratory on Human Interfaces in Information Systems. His research activity has mainly been carried out in the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) field, with the goal to introduce computational support to improve usability, accessibility, and user experience for all in the various possible contexts of use. For this purpose, he has continuously led numerous interdisciplinary and international projects for several years. He is also the coordinator of the National Research Project (PRIN) EMPATHY. In his research work he has always aimed at deepening and intertwining both theoretical and practical innovative aspects. Over the years he has been working on Ubiquitous Interactive Systems, End-User Development, Adaptive User Interfaces, Accessibility, and Model-based Design. He has published more than two hundred fifty papers in refereed international conferences or journals, some of them have been widely cited (https://scholar.google.it/citations?user=6J7ls8cAAAAJ&hl=en). He has been chair or co-chair of several international well-known HCI conferences.

Talk: End-User development of IoT and robots ecosystems
Abstract

End-User Development (EUD) is a growing research field aiming to provide people without programming experience with concepts, methods and tools to allow them to create or modify their applications. Recent mainstream technological trends related to the Internet of Things (IoT) and the availability of robots have further stimulated interest in this approach. This talk aims to help understand and address the issues involved in end-user development of Internet of Things and social humanoid robot applications, which are characterised by the combined use of various interconnected sensors and objects. I discuss possible approaches to supporting users in specifying, debugging, executing and monitoring personalized behaviours in Internet of Things scenarios. The discussion will indicate some conceptual dimensions useful to assess possible solutions, report concrete experiences in real-world deployments from recent projects, and analyse the main current challenges.

 

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2044

Antonio Krueger, DFKI, Saarbrücken, Germany

Bio

Antonio Krüger is CEO and scientific director of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence GmbH (DFKI) and head of the department “Cognitive Assistants” at DFKI. He is a full professor for Computer Science at Saarland University (since 2009), Head of the Ubiquitous Media Technology Lab and scientific director of the Innovative Retail Laboratory (IRL) at DFKI. Prof. Krueger is an internationally renowned expert on Man-Machine-Interaction and Artificial Intelligence. In 2010 he has established the Mediainformatics study programme at the Saarland University and directs it to this day. Antonio is a co-founder of the Saarbrücken-based technology company Eyeled GmbH, which focuses on the development of mobile and ubiquitous information systems. Many of his research findings have found their way into applications in retail and other industrial domains. From 2004 to 2009 he was a professor of computer science and geoinformatics at the University of Münster and acted as the managing director of the institute for geoinformatics. He studied Computer Science and Economics at Saarland University and finished his Ph.D in 1999 as a member of the Saarbrücken graduate school of „Cognitive Science“. Antonio has published more than 200 scientific articles and papers in internationally recognized journals and conferences and is member of several steering committees, editorial boards and scientific advisory committees.

Talk: Dynamic Passive Haptics in Virtual Reality
Abstract

Advanced Haptic PassiveFeedback in VR Interactive virtual reality (VR) applications demand rich haptic sensations to support immersive experiences. This tutorial describes our research efforts aiming to bring enhanced haptic interactions to VR users. Leveraging the highly realistic haptic feedback provided by real, physical proxy objects, we will present two orthogonal research directions targeting to overcome the central drawbacks of conventional passive haptics. The first research direction leverages physical manipulations to enhance scalability through reusable yet low-complexity dynamic passive haptic proxy objects. Orthogonal to this, we will discuss hand redirection techniques in a second, more software-focused research direction based on virtual manipulations. We will also review other passive haptic feedback mechanisms

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a9VBKC_wSharon Oviatt, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Bio

Professor Sharon Oviatt is internationally known for her work on human-centered interfaces, multimodal-multisensor interfaces, mobile interfaces, educational interfaces, the cognitive impact of computer input tools, and behavioral analytics. Her research is known for its pioneering and multidisciplinary style at the intersection of Computer Science, Psychology, Linguistics, and Learning Sciences. She has published a large volume of high-impact papers, including recent books on: The Design of Future Educational Interfaces (2013), The Paradigm Shift to Multimodality in Contemporary Computer Interfaces (2015), and the multi-volume Handbook of Multimodal-Multisensor Interfaces (co-edited with B. Schuller, P. Cohen, A. Krueger, G. Potamianos and D. Sonntag, 2017-2019). Sharon has been recipient of the inaugural ACM-ICMI Sustained Accomplishment Award, National Science Foundation Special Creativity Award, ACM-SIGCHI CHI Academy Award, and an ACM Fellow Award. She also has delivered over 100 keynotes, invited talks, and tutorials worldwide at conferences, universities and corporate events.

Talk: Multimodal behavioral analytics and interface tools: advancing human learning
Abstract

Multimodal-multisensor data afford a deeply human-centred foundation for detecting human behavioral states, and then designing user-centered adaptive systems based on them. For example, analysis of human communication and movement patterns are proving particularly apt for assessing human intention (e.g., deception), mental load and cognition (e.g., attentional load, domain expertise), motivation and emotion (e.g., task engagement), and related health and mental health status (e.g., anxiety, neurodegenerative disease). In this lecture, I’ll focus on what multimodal behavioral analytics is revealing about human learning. I’ll also describe how expressively rich interface tools, including multimodal ones based on writing and speech, can stimulate human learning.

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5gqEzQ-QMarianna Obrist, University of Sussex, UK

Bio

Marianna Obrist is Professor of Multisensory Experiences and Head of the Sussex Computer-Human Interaction (SCHI ‘sky’) Lab at the University of Sussex, UK. She is also the research group leader of the Creative Technology Research Group at the School of Engineering and Informatics. Her research focus is on the study of touch, taste, and smell experiences for novel interface and interaction design. Before joining Sussex, Marianna was a Marie Curie Fellow at Newcastle University, UK, and prior to this an Assistant Professor at the University of Salzburg, Austria. Marianna is an inaugural member for the ACM Future of Computing Academy, and was selected Young Scientist 2017 and 2018 to attend the World Economic Forum in the People’s Republic of China. She is co-founder of OWidgets LTD, a University start-up that is enabling the design of novel olfactory experiences. Most recently, Marianna became a Visiting Professor at the Burberry Material Futures Research Group at RCA London and was a Visiting Professor at the HCI Engineering Group at MIT CSAIL in summer 2019. For more details see: http://www.multisensory.info

Talk: When the senses meet technology: designing multisensory experiences
Abstract

Multisensory experiences are a central part of our everyday lives. However, we often tend to take them for granted, at least when our different senses function normally (when we have sight functioning) or are corrected-to-normal (when we use glasses). However, closer inspection to any, even the most mundane experiences, reveals the remarkable sensory world in which we live in. Consider the seemingly ordinary experience of eating a regular meal. At first, it may seem like an ordinary experience, however, it is actually a fusion of the senses. We first eat with our eyes, but we are also exposed to countless sensory signals that will influence our dining experience such as food textures, tastes, aromas, and even sounds that come both from the atmosphere in which we are immersed in while eating and our interactions with the food and utensils we use to eat. Beyond eating there are many more examples for multisensory experiences can make a difference in how we perceive and interact with the world we live in, from the physical, virtual, and mixed reality environments. I will present the role of multisensory research from a Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and experience-centered design perspective, and showcase how we can integrate knowledge on the human sensory systems with advances in computing technology.

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NachmanLama Nachman, Intel Fellow, Director of Anticipatory Computing Lab

Bio

Lama Nachman is an Intel fellow and Director of the Anticipatory Computing Lab in Intel Labs. Her research is focused on creating contextually aware experiences that understand users through sensing and sense-making, anticipate their needs and act on their behalf. She leads a multi-disciplinary team of researchers that explore new user experiences, sensing systems, algorithms and applications and transfer these capabilities to biz units to impact future Intel products. Lama has 24 years of experience in the areas of context-aware computing, multi-modal interactions, sensor networks, computer architecture, embedded systems and wireless technologies. One of the most notable achievements of Nachman’s career is an Intel collaboration with Professor Stephen Hawking. Beginning in 2012, she led a team of researchers who developed a new software platform and sensing system to help Hawking communicate. Subsequently, she also led the effort to take that technology to the open-source community, enabling people with disabilities worldwide to communicate using limited input and live as independently as possible. Prior to joining Intel, Lama has held senior positions at Ubicom Inc, Weave Innovations and Microsoft Corporation. Lama received her MS and BS in computer engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Talk:
Abstract

 

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Fabio Violante, Arduino, Italy

Bio

Abstract

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gyxH1DQwLuigi Cicchese, Reply

Bio

Luigi Cicchese is Partner of Concept Reply, the IOT specialist team within the Reply Group. His company has more than 10 years’ experience on connected objects in complex environment.  He holds a master in Electrical Engineering from the University of Florence and an MBA from Lake School University in Chicago (IL). Prior to Reply Luigi as held many international positions as a R&D Director for Motorola always leading large development teams with a mix of hardware and software development. In his current position Luigi has dedicated his time to the innovation in the Industrial IoT and Connected Vehicle market also through several international research projects.

Talk: User interaction and experience in smart vehicles
Abstract

The Challenge: Automotive faces crafting pioneering new blueprints to reach a different type of customer and shaping new relationships in unchartered mobility territories. It will be messy, we need to let go of some of the past, embrace the new. A recent analysis of leading OEMs revealed that there is no “stand out” connected car experience. Most functionality is the similar to identical and nobody has broken through the “ceiling” to include an eco-system of related “car” and “mobility” services. To create a break-out experience from the current “connect car” mold, we now have the opportunity to understand the rapidly changing mobility needs behaviors from a customer’s perspective and shape radically new experiences.

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Gianluca Brugnoli, Digital Mckinsey, Italy

Bio

Talk:Designing Smart Experiences. The smart and invisible future of interactions and services
Abstract

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